Meeting Jesus with Whiskey on My Breath

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This morning in my two-minute commute to work I was listening to the Bobby Bones show. He was playing “Whiskey on My Breath” by Love and Theft. I came in right in the middle of it. The refrain really grabbed my attention, and I sat in the car to listen to the rest before going into the building. After it was over, Bobby went on and on about how much he loved the song, and he kept playing the refrain over and over. I was glad he kept pushing redial.

Stephen and Eric, two of the Love and Theft band members, have personally experienced alcoholism in their families. You can read about it here. Eric decided to give up drinking as a result of family members drinking themselves to death. The song was written as a result of their own personal experience.

Alcoholism is a family disease. It spans generations and causes codependency among family members, an inability to connect at an intimate level, controlling behaviors and all kinds of psychological disorders. It doesn’t just affect the alcoholic. The damage continues for generations until somebody gets help…. and not only the alcoholic needs intervention. In fact, sometimes the most affected and dysfunctional ones are the family members. It’s sad and devastating to see lives wasted because of this disease – and it is a disease – when there is so much help available today. Denial helps nobody and harms everyone in its wake.

I came into the office and watched the music video. I remember those mornings waking up and wanting to stop the roller coaster caused by my drinking problem. I was a binge drinker – never a daily drinker – and I never drank in the mornings unless it was a social occasion. But, still, I knew where I was headed if I didn’t stop. I’d seen it all too often, and I was smart enough to realize early on that it would be harder to stop if I allowed it to continue. Blessedly, my first husband set a boundary, and I stepped up to the plate at age 26 and got help. The video shows this guy cleaning up and everybody has smiles on their faces, but it’s never that easy or quick. It is a lifelong process. But, OMG, is it ever worth it.

So, I’ll be looking up Love and Theft this morning and probably downloading some music. I’m also wishing that anyone who is waking up on this Monday knowing that they have to quit will take some inspiration from this music and this old gal. I know somebody must need it, or I wouldn’t be compelled to pen this. There is help available and there is abundant life without alcohol and drugs. It’s not easy but it’s a helluva lot easier than the path you are on. You can do this, but you can’t do it alone. I’m praying for you right now, and God must be on your side because he’s pressing my buttons this morning.

How to get help for alcoholism

If you are affected by a loved ones drinking, click here.

Whiskey on My Breath by Love and Theft

I woke up with a pounding head
With a bottle laying in the bed
There was a little, a little bit left
So I picked it up and I killed the rest

Oh I know I’m going to heaven
But I can’t go with me like this
I need to pull myself together
Before then
No and I ain’t afraid of dying
But what scares me to death
Is meeting Jesus
With whiskey on my breath.

I lost her and all my friends
Broke all but one of my Lord’s 10
But Jesus died for all my sins
That’s how I know I’m getting in

Oh I know I’m going to heaven
But I can’t go with me like this
I need to pull myself together
Before then
No and I ain’t afraid of dying
But what scares me to death
Is meeting Jesus
With whiskey on my breath

Oh I know I’m going to heaven
But I can’t go with me like this
I need to pull myself together
Before then
No and I ain’t afraid of dying
But what scares me to death
Is meeting Jesus
With whiskey on my breath
Is meeting Jesus
With whiskey on my breath

6 thoughts on “Meeting Jesus with Whiskey on My Breath

  1. GREAT JOB! Thank you for baring your soul! I can only say “Amen!” and add my prayer to yours. It’s not just about the alcoholic, it’s so much deeper than that! An entire family is hurt and disabled with the disease! I will add my name to the wall of survivors! I still battle the trauma of alcoholism’s grip on my childhood, but am so grateful to learn it had nothing to do with me! I am learning that at an age when you are being taught about the world as a young child, you can also be a victim of those lessons. I’m so grateful to have lived through it!! Bless you for sharing!

    Best Regards, KAREN LOGAN

    >

    • You are welcome and thanks for sharing about your life. My life as a child was affected by it, and codependency was a more painful issue for me than my alcoholism. It was responsible for my struggles with relationships for sure. Looking forward to meeting you!

  2. Thank you Sharon for highlighting this topic. In regards to myself I drank from my late teens until age 25. I stopped in one day when I realized that the experiences of our lives can only truly be appreciated with a clear mind.
    Regarding society, I get so frustrated with the overwhelming politics of “legal” gun ownership stemmed from a few nuts that take a few dozen lives each year; but nobody gives a crap about the tens of thousands of lives lost each year because of drunk drivers. Or how about the countless children and spouses whose lives are destroyed by this evil. Well that’s my rant – don’t forget to watch the beer commercials on Super Bowl Sunday glorifying their social poison.

    • Well we figured it out about the same age. I just love that I don’t have all that list time due to blackouts and hangovers. I pretty much always feel good. I have to watch the sugar though! It’s almost like alcoholism is invisible. People just want to ignore it and excuse it. It kills so many people and destroys the lives of all of those around them.

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